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Keyword: Heralding Our History

In July 1776, Dr. William Shippen Jr. (1736-1808) was appointed chief physician of the Continental army hospital in New Jersey by George Washington. In October, he became director general of all …

Today you can grab a cup of coffee or sit for breakfast/lunch in the house (Langhorne Coffee House) that was built by Gilbert Hicks (1728-1787) in 1763, the house where Edward Hicks (April 4, 1780-Aug. 23, 1849), Quaker preacher and folk art painter, was born.

At the crossroads of Maple and Bellevue avenues in Langhorne, two buildings anchor the history of the town.This intersection was originally known as the town of Four Lanes End, the crossing of two …

Hulmeville’s glory days may have passed a century ago, but there is still plenty going on in this tiny town and good reasons to visit our historic community.Hulmeville showed its ongoing community …

Following incorporation in 1872, Hulmeville continued to flourish. The mills were running and there were a couple of textile factories running in town. Johnson Hall became a popular meeting place for …

John Hulme’s success in having the Farmers Bank of Bucks County and the Hulmeville Post Office established in Hulmeville ensured the village was a hub of commerce, finance and communication by …

Hulmeville is one of the oldest communities in Bucks County. It is also one of the smallest. Its current boundaries cover less than half of a square mile. The land that became Hulmeville was …

Social studies teachers from the Palisades School District got to check out the weight of a Revolution-era cannonball and examine a Colonial stoveback during a tour of the Durham Grist Mill this month.

Mary Sheridan Park in Lambertville is diminutive in size but rich in items of historic interest, from its 1840s vintage city jail, to its 1870 Civil War monument, to its often-overlooked Civil War naval cannon.

It was the depths of the Great Depression, the worst economic period the United States had ever seen and the people of Lambertville were just as affected by this disaster as anyone.

In 1816, Philip Marshall, a carpenter from Hopewell, NJ, relocated to Lambertville with his wife Sarah and their 6-year-old son, James. The family expanded to include four daughters, and James Wilson …

John Holcombe, father of Richard, was the first settler in the Lambertville area. A Quaker born in England and formerly of Abington, John purchased 350 acres in 1705 that included the northern half …

Before there was a town named Lambertville, there was Coryell’s Ferry, one of the first ferries to operate on the Delaware River. Established in 1733, the ferry served as a vital link on Old York …

In the heart of Yardley Borough lies a privately owned body of water that dates to the early 1700s. Lake Afton first functioned as a millpond and later as a siltation basin. It has since become the …

Hundreds of dignitaries and common folk gathered in Bristol on Oct. 27, 1827, to see the first shovelful of earth dug for the Delaware Canal. The future waterway connecting the Lehigh …

Three bodies of water — the Delaware River, the Delaware Canal, and Lake Afton — have led people to Yardley. From the first Lenni Lenape to New York City dwellers seeking post-COVID havens, Yardley and its waterways have provided sustenance and serenity.

One could assume that Yardley was named after the man who emigrated to America after purchasing the land from William Penn, but the story is not that simple. William Yardley was an English Quaker, who …

Heralding Our History: A boat helped keep Durham’s iron industry afloat

As you enter the village of Durham, one of the first things that catches your attention is a pavilion located on the village green. Under this structure stands a full size replica of one of the …

Heralding Our History: Tales of Durham’s first inhabitants

Four hundred years ago, the area we now know as Durham Township looked a lot different than it does now. Dark forest covered the entire landscape and the only areas that saw sunlight were the narrow …

Heralding Our History: Durham furnace gets new life as a mill

One of the significant challenges of colonial-era iron making was that the furnaces were charcoal fueled. Since the old Durham furnace consumed the wood of one entire acre of forest per day, it …

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