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Heralding Our History

It was the depths of the Great Depression, the worst economic period the United States had ever seen and the people of Lambertville were just as affected by this disaster as anyone.

In 1816, Philip Marshall, a carpenter from Hopewell, NJ, relocated to Lambertville with his wife Sarah and their 6-year-old son, James. The family expanded to include four daughters, and James Wilson …

John Holcombe, father of Richard, was the first settler in the Lambertville area. A Quaker born in England and formerly of Abington, John purchased 350 acres in 1705 that included the northern half …

Before there was a town named Lambertville, there was Coryell’s Ferry, one of the first ferries to operate on the Delaware River. Established in 1733, the ferry served as a vital link on Old York …

In the heart of Yardley Borough lies a privately owned body of water that dates to the early 1700s. Lake Afton first functioned as a millpond and later as a siltation basin. It has since become the …

Hundreds of dignitaries and common folk gathered in Bristol on Oct. 27, 1827, to see the first shovelful of earth dug for the Delaware Canal. The future waterway connecting the Lehigh …

Three bodies of water — the Delaware River, the Delaware Canal, and Lake Afton — have led people to Yardley. From the first Lenni Lenape to New York City dwellers seeking post-COVID havens, Yardley and its waterways have provided sustenance and serenity.

One could assume that Yardley was named after the man who emigrated to America after purchasing the land from William Penn, but the story is not that simple. William Yardley was an English Quaker, who …

Heralding Our History: A boat helped keep Durham’s iron industry afloat

As you enter the village of Durham, one of the first things that catches your attention is a pavilion located on the village green. Under this structure stands a full size replica of one of the …

Heralding Our History: Tales of Durham’s first inhabitants

Four hundred years ago, the area we now know as Durham Township looked a lot different than it does now. Dark forest covered the entire landscape and the only areas that saw sunlight were the narrow …

Heralding Our History: Durham furnace gets new life as a mill

One of the significant challenges of colonial-era iron making was that the furnaces were charcoal fueled. Since the old Durham furnace consumed the wood of one entire acre of forest per day, it …

Iron ore, limestone and wood for charcoal, the three main ingredients for 18th century iron making were all abundant in the area now called Durham Township. In 1727, 12 investors from London, …

Heralding Our History: Worstall brick kiln fires up Newtown transformation

Brick is one thing that changes the complexion of a community. Newtown had at least two brick structures, one on South Main Street and the other — later known as the Brick Hotel — at the intersection of State Street and Washington Avenue in the 18th century.

Heralding Our History: Archambault’s journey from Napoleon to Newtown

Walking along Washington Avenue in Newtown, you may see a large, hand-painted sign labeled “Archambault Square” with a diagram of building lots. What does this mean, and who was Joseph …

Heralding Our History: Horse race to space race, State Street has seen it all

The bucolic fields of Newtown have long been a place for farming, horse breeding and stables. In keeping with this deep agrarian past, it was commonplace at the turn of the century to see working …

Heralding Our History: Pride surges from the ashes of “Lighthouse Hill”

The African American community has been an integral part of the local fabric from the time Newtown was founded. During the first half of the 19th century, the Leedom Farm, the Pine Grove Farm and the …

Heralding Our History: When Newtown was the County Seat

Although no visible evidence remains today, Newtown served as the County Seat of Bucks County from 1726 to 1812, before it was moved to Doylestown. During this period, this rural community grew.

In 1799, some German citizens objected to paying a window tax levied by Congress during President John Adams’ administration. Perhaps due to a language difficulty, they interpreted it as a tax on …

Richard Moore (1793-1874) moved from Gwynedd to Quakertown in about 1813, and quickly established himself as a teacher. Quakertown was becoming an educational and intellectual center. Quakers always …

The small building located at 1237 W. Broad St. in Quakertown was built in 1772. At only 15-feet-by-15-feet, it was originally an addition to a log home. When Abel Robert’s son married a girl who lived ...

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