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Keyword: Bucks County history

HISTORY LIVES: The Scumblers

During the early summers of the 20th century, a group of Philadelphia artists took the trolley north to the Village of Edison and practiced their art in an old barn referred to as “the Shack.” This group of men called themselves “The Scumblers.”

HISTORY LIVES: Green Tree Inn

In 1808, Septimus Evans from Warwick Township bought a 2-acre building lot at the corner of North Main and Broad streets for $250.

HISTORY LIVES: Silkworm Craze

Doylestown and Newtown townships were two communities hit hard by that curious and widespread fever known as the silkworm craze, which prevailed for more than a decade in the first part of the 19th century. Generally, the craze extended from 1830 to 1844.

HISTORY LIVES: Doylestown Friends Meeting House

The early Quakers who came to Bucks County were primarily farmers; therefore they usually located their meeting houses in rural areas rather than in towns.

HISTORY LIVES: 50th anniversary of Peace Valley Park

From Stories Behind Peace Valley by Kathryn McKenna, published by the Doylestown Historical Society …

HISTORY LIVES: St. Paul’s Lutheran Church

Lutheran worship services were begun in Doylestown by Rev. Ferdinand Berkemeyer in 1860 and held in the county courthouse.

A bulge in the 200-year-old stone wall of the Durham Grist Mill has been determined to be “purely cosmetic,” according to Danielle Cox, township administrator. After David Oleksa, president of the …

HISTORY LIVES: Fanny Chapman Memorial Pool.

William R. Mercer (1862-1939), younger brother of Henry Chapman Mercer (1856-1930), and his wife Martha Dana Mercer (1872-1960) enjoyed inviting families to swim in their …

HISTORY LIVES: Quarter Midget Racing

The Aug. 18, 1959 issue of The Doylestown Intelligencer reported that “Billy Kline, driving car No. 9, highlighted the weekly racing of the Doylestown Quarter-Midget Racing Club …

It’s a 152-year-old Solebury mystery. A headstone for Susan Van Campen, 57, who died in 1872, was found on the private property of New Hope Colony Foundation for the Arts on River Road.

The Yardley Historical Association will hold a guided walking tour of the borough’s downtown area Sunday May 19. Beginning at the Old Library by Lake Afton on West Afton Avenue at 2 p.m., the …

HISTORY LIVES: Mercer Folk Fest

The first iteration of the Mercer Museum Folk Fest was held April 27, 1974, and called “Museum Family Day.” The concept began earlier that year when the Bicentennial Committee of …

One last look at Sterner’s Mill

We had to sneak away to satisfy our young curiosities, so we did. The place stood majestically on the curve of the road since 1758. She seemed to still be waiting there to serve those who needed her, …

HISTORY LIVES: Heyday of the trolley

On a sunny day in May 1898, Doylestown’s Main Street was gaily decorated as crowds awaited the arrival of the first trolley car. Initially run by the Bucks County Electric …

For one local family, Sycamore Lane Farm represents the homecoming of a lifetime. The Hilltown Township property is this year’s Bucks County Designer House & Gardens showcase.

HISTORY LIVES: Sommer Maid Creamery

The Doylestown Creamery, a dairy and milk business, was established in 1910 by Asher Lear on the north side of Union Street between Broad and North Main streets.

HISTORY LIVES: Piper Tavern

In 1759, a tavern was built by Joseph Bladen at the junction of the Durham and Philadelphia-Easton roads. In 1778, that tavern was purchased by George Piper, a colonel in the …

Today you can grab a cup of coffee or sit for breakfast/lunch in the house (Langhorne Coffee House) that was built by Gilbert Hicks (1728-1787) in 1763, the house where Edward Hicks (April 4, 1780-Aug. 23, 1849), Quaker preacher and folk art painter, was born.

At the crossroads of Maple and Bellevue avenues in Langhorne, two buildings anchor the history of the town.This intersection was originally known as the town of Four Lanes End, the crossing of two …

HISTORY LIVES: Hornberger’s Bakery

In 1956, George Hornberger sold a bakery in Northeast Philadelphia and moved his family to Doylestown. His bakery in the Mayfair section had been in operation since 1923.

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