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Keyword: Bucks County History

Buckingham Township supervisors have authorized advertising for an amendment to its Historic Preservation Ordinance to incorporate Buckingham Village into the district.

Social studies teachers from the Palisades School District got to check out the weight of a Revolution-era cannonball and examine a Colonial stoveback during a tour of the Durham Grist Mill this month.

HISTORY LIVES: Rotzel Coal and Lumber Yard

Charles Rotzel (1820-1896) was born in New Britain Township. When he came to Doylestown as a young man in 1847 he established himself as a wagon builder until opening a …

HISTORY LIVES: Village of Edison

The Village of Edison south of Doylestown was formerly called Bridge Point, due to its seven-arch stone bridge which was part of the main road connecting Philadelphia with Doylestown, Easton and New …

HISTORY LIVES: Handmade Valentine

Henry Hohlbain (1788-1877), of New Britain Township, created this cutout valentine in 1812. It is dedicated to his valentine and childhood sweetheart Martha Thomas (1795-1868).

HISTORY LIVES: Camp Meeting

In August of 1889, a broadside was posted all over Doylestown, promoting a camp meeting “in Mr. Fisher’s Grove on East Street near the borough line.” It was sponsored by …

In the heart of Yardley Borough lies a privately owned body of water that dates to the early 1700s. Lake Afton first functioned as a millpond and later as a siltation basin. It has since become the …

HISTORY LIVES: Corner of Church, Lacy and North Main streets

The Five Points Hotel at 235 N. Main St. was once owned by William B. Crouthamel, a Republican. The late Judge Harmon Yerkes, a staunch Democrat, was on …

Hundreds of dignitaries and common folk gathered in Bristol on Oct. 27, 1827, to see the first shovelful of earth dug for the Delaware Canal. The future waterway connecting the Lehigh …

HISTORY LIVES: Thomas P. Otter, Artist (1832-1890)

A resident of Philadelphia, “Thomas Proudley Otter trained at the Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts. He was one of the first artists to sketch, paint, and …

Three bodies of water — the Delaware River, the Delaware Canal, and Lake Afton — have led people to Yardley. From the first Lenni Lenape to New York City dwellers seeking post-COVID havens, Yardley and its waterways have provided sustenance and serenity.

One could assume that Yardley was named after the man who emigrated to America after purchasing the land from William Penn, but the story is not that simple. William Yardley was an English Quaker, who …

HISTORY LIVES: Woolworth’s “Five-and-Dime.”

The first successful “Woolworth’s Great Five Cent Store” opened in Lancaster in 1879 and, later, in successive Pennsylvania cities and beyond. (By 1904, there …

A local couple and Upper Makefield officials have teamed up to preserve an important piece of American history.

Heralding Our History: Tales of Durham’s first inhabitants

Four hundred years ago, the area we now know as Durham Township looked a lot different than it does now. Dark forest covered the entire landscape and the only areas that saw sunlight were the narrow …

Heralding Our History: Durham furnace gets new life as a mill

One of the significant challenges of colonial-era iron making was that the furnaces were charcoal fueled. Since the old Durham furnace consumed the wood of one entire acre of forest per day, it …

HISTORY LIVES: Community Christmas Tree

The Intelligencer reported the Doylestown community Christmas tree had again been lighted on December 17, 1936.“Nothing but comment of a complimentary nature was heard …

Iron ore, limestone and wood for charcoal, the three main ingredients for 18th century iron making were all abundant in the area now called Durham Township. In 1727, 12 investors from London, …

Heralding Our History: Worstall brick kiln fires up Newtown transformation

Brick is one thing that changes the complexion of a community. Newtown had at least two brick structures, one on South Main Street and the other — later known as the Brick Hotel — at the intersection of State Street and Washington Avenue in the 18th century.

The Old Library by Lake Afton will be decked out in its holiday best this month as the Yardley Historical Association welcomes visitors to community open houses on the next three Saturdays.

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